5. Economy and Work

5.1.

INTRODUCTION

The Burnley Local Plan’s land use policies for employment uses are spread across three chapters. This chapter sets out the Borough’s land use policies for employment uses outside Burnley and Padiham town centres. Land use policies for the town centres can be found in Chapter 10 “Burnley Town Centre” and Chapter 11 “Padiham Town Centre”.

5.2.

Traditionally, local plan employment policies have only covered industry, offices and warehousing. The Burnley Local Plan, however, recognises the economy is constantly changing and acknowledges the increasing importance that employment in sectors such as retail, leisure, the arts, culture and tourism have to play in a diverse modern economy.

5.3.

Nevertheless, the local economy still remains relatively dependent on manufacturing and the Burnley Local Plan will continue to support the modernisation and growth of this sector. About 35% of the Borough’s 34,000 jobs are in manufacturing, nearly twice the national average (1997 Annual Employment Survey). Manufacturing jobs are largely concentrated in the following locations:

  • Large, modern industrial estates such as Network 65, Shuttleworth Mead, Rossendale Road and Heasandford; and
  • Older industrial premises often concentrated along the Leeds and Liverpool Canal corridor and in many cases close by residential areas.
5.4.

The strength of this sector is its diversity, with no particular industry dominating, and the presence of some technologically advanced sectors, such as aerospace. However, low skill, low value added jobs, which are increasingly vulnerable to foreign competition predominate. Low skill jobs, generally, pay low wages with the result that average wages in the Borough are about 86% of the national average, and many households are eligible for benefit. Low wage, low skill jobs also lead to low aspirations and over 38% of the workforce currently lack qualifications.

5.5.

Unemployment rates are currently low with a figure of 3.3% in February 2001. There are, however, concentrations in certain wards and groups, such as young people, and the Asian community.

5.6.

The service sector has been steadily increasing as a proportion of employment and now comprises almost two out of every three jobs. In 1970, only 33.9% of the workforce was employed in this sector, increasing to 53.1% in 1990 and 61.7% in 1998. Burnley town centre has a thriving commercial area of offices and professional services. Businesses involved in information technology have made significant investment in the Borough.

5.7.

A considerable element of service employment is in the public sector with the largest employers in the Borough being the Health Care Trust. Private sector service employment in the retail and leisure industries is also significant, such jobs being particularly concentrated in Burnley town centre. The Borough has proved particularly attractive to large supermarkets seeking sites around the periphery of the town centre.

5.8.

If sustained growth is to be achieved in the service sector the issues of skills, suitable sites for inward investment, and the encouragement of new business start-ups and improved survival rates will need to be addressed.

5.9.

BURNLEY LOCAL PLAN STRATEGY

The Burnley Local Plan’s key aim for the economy is to promote growth and diversification in the local economy. This will be pursued by identifying a range of quality sites within the urban boundary and town centres that will facilitate attraction of quality employment in the North West region’s sectoral priorities1. Diversification and modernisation will lead to more jobs, better pay, and a more balanced local economy better equipped to compete in today’s global marketplace. The Plan will particularly seek to concentrate employment development within the town centres, especially offices, retail, leisure, arts, culture and tourism development.

1 Target sectors: Environmental technologies; Life science industries; Medical equipment and technology; Financial and professional services; Tourism; Computer, software and internet based services; Creative industries, media and public relations. Established sectors: Chemicals; Textiles; Aerospace; Mechanical and other engineering; Energy; Automotive; Food and drink.

5.10.

Economic diversification will be further pursued by encouraging the growth of small businesses. Encouraging improvement to existing premises and employment areas will also be a priority in the pursuit of a more modern local economy. Rural diversification will be encouraged where it does notconflict with the environmental and sustainability objectives of the Plan.

5.11.

Economic diversification will be further pursued by encouraging the growth of small businesses. Encouraging improvement to existing premises and employment areas will also be a priority in the pursuit of a more modern local economy. Rural diversification will be encouraged where it does not conflict with the environmental and sustainability objectives of the Plan.

5.12.

OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS

The employment policies of the Local Plan have been developed to meet the objectives under Key Aim 2 – “To promote growth and diversification in the local economy”. These are set out in the following section, along with targets designed to measure progress towards achievement of the objectives.

5.13.

The Monitoring and Review section of the plan outlines in more detail how the Council will measure performance against the Plan’s objectives and targets.

ECONOMY AND WORK – OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS

OBJECTIVE EW1- To modernise and diversify the local economy

  • Target EW1a – By 2008 to increase to 2550 the number of employees in the Regional Development Agency growth sectors from a 2002 baseline of 2350.
  • Target EW1b – To increase the number of people employed in financial and professional services employment within the Borough by 10% by 2008 from a 2003 baseline of 3282

OBJECTIVE EW2 – To maintain and improve established industries and employment areas

  • Target EW2a – To maintain and enhance rental levels on major industrial estates within the Borough.

OBJECTIVE EW3 – To further diversify the rural economy

  • Target EW3a – To secure the re-use of five former agricultural buildings for business use by 2010
  • Target EW3b – To increase the number of businesses based in rural areas by 5%.

OBJECTIVE EW4 - To maximise the contribution of the town’s built heritage to economic regeneration

  • Target EW4a – To secure re-use of 2 vacant buildings in Conservation Areas for employment use per annum.

OBJECTIVE EW5 - To encourage the creation and development of small businesses

  • Target EW5a – To increase the proportion of the workforce who are self-employed to 11%% by 2016 from the 2001 Burnley baseline of 10.2%
  • Target EW5b – To help secure 37 new business start ups per 1,000 adult residents per annum

OBJECTIVE EW6 - To encourage further development of tourism, leisure, arts, culture, recreation and sport

  • Target EW6a – 25% increase in the number of visitors to the Borough by 2010.
  • Target EW6b – 2 additional leisure facilities of over 1,000m² gross floor area developed by 2010.

OBJECTIVE EW7 – To encourage growth in new technology industries

  • Target EW7a – To increase the number of knowledge based businesses in the Borough by 25% by the end of the plan period.
  • Target EW7b - To maintain the percentage of employment in high and medium tech industries at the baseline figure of 8.2% in 2003.

OBJECTIVE EW8 – To modernise older industrial areas and premises

  • Target EW8a – Environmental enhancements to sites and premises secured on 80% of approvals in designated improvement areas
  • Target EW8b - 15 buildings re-used/re-furbished/improved by 2010
  • Target EW8c - 1,000m² of new floorspace created by 2010
  • Target EW8d - 2,500m² of floorspace re-used or brought back into use by 2010
  • Target EW8f - 220 jobs created and 60 jobs safeguarded by 2005-2006

POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

This section includes the Council’s land use policies and proposals for employment outside Burnley and Padiham town centres. Each policy is numbered (EW1, EW2, EW3, etc.), and is followed by any land use specific proposals (numbered EW1/1, EW1/2, etc), which are also shown on the Proposals Map, and a reasoned justification. The reasoned justification explains why the Council have included a particular policy in the Local Plan

POLICY EW1 - LAND FOR BUSINESS (B1) AND GENERAL INDUSTRIAL (B2) AND WAREHOUSING (B8) DEVELOPMENT

The Burnley Local Plan allocates seventeen sites, 57.19 hectares of land, for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing uses (B8).

Other proposals for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing uses (B8) will be assessed against the General Policies of the Burnley Local Plan and the following criteria. The proposal:

  1. is acceptable with respect to size, layout, parking, landscaping and design;
  2. is accessible, or potentially accessible, by a choice of transport modes and does not have a detrimental effect on the safe and efficient operation of the trunk road network;
  3. would not harm the amenity of nearby occupiers;
  4. would not harm the character, appearance or environment of the site and its surroundings;
  5. includes measures to address security;
  6. includes, where appropriate, training and recruitment provision as required by Policy EW10 – ‘Development and Training Provision’ of the Burnley Local Plan; and
  7. includes, where necessary, a Travel Plan, see Transport and Movement Policy TM3 – Travel Pans.

The following sites have been identified on the Proposals Map for the B1, B2, and B8 uses specified:

EW1/1 Widow Hill Road, Heasandford Industrial Estate (2.0ha.).

Suitable for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing (B8) uses this allocation on the Heasandford Industrial Estate has been carried forward from the Burnley Local Plan First Review. An ecological survey of the site will be required to accompany any planning application. Should any mitigation measures be identified in such a report they will be a condition of any planning approval.

EW1/2 Balderstone Lane, Heasandford Industrial Estate (7.08ha.)

Suitable for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing (B8) uses and carried forward from the Burnley Local Plan First Review, retention of this allocation maximises utilisation of existing infrastructure. Measures to mitigate the impact of any development on housing close to the site may be necessary. An ecological survey of the site may be required to accompany any planning application. Should any mitigation measures be identified in such a report they will be a condition of any planning approval.

EW1/4 Hepworths, Pollard Moor, Padiham (18.21ha.)

This site, suitable for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing (B8) uses, is a major brownfield redevelopment opportunity which would bring currently contaminated land back into use. There is potential to improve access from the site to the M65 making this a highly accessible location. The Council will work in partnership with the North West Development Agency (NWDA), the private sector and other partners to bring this site forward. An ecological survey of the site will be required to accompany any planning application. Should any mitigation measures be identified in such a report they will be a condition of any planning approval. A development brief will be prepared for this site.

EW1/5 Stoneyholme (10.45ha.)

This allocation incorporates land carried forward from the Burnley Local Plan – First Review together with the addition of land currently operated by Lancashire County Council as a civic amenity site; the Princess Way depot owned by the Borough Council; a gasometer and the Metro Metal scrapyard. The site has good access to the M65.

The site is considered suitable for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing (B8) uses. A development brief exists for the Princess Way Depot site. This will be expanded to cover the whole site. The Princess Way corridor and the railway viaduct form significant gateways into the Borough. The Council will seek to enhance the environment along Princess Way.

The Council is currently pursuing further infrastructure investment to allow development of this allocation. Part of the site is currently in use as a playing field and use of this site for employment purposes will be dependent on the developer securing replacement playing field provision within the Stoneyholme area. The location and nature of this will be informed by the Council’s Assessment of Open Space, Sport and Recreation. A recreation site has been identified at Oswald Street, Burnley which could incorporate replacement playing field provision (see Community Facilities Proposal CF3/1). Any replacement provision should be ready for use before development of the existing playing field commences.

EW1/6 – Westgate (2.82ha.)

Located in Burnley Town Centre this site is suitable for business (B1) uses. Any redevelopment of the site should maintain links with the canal and cycleway, and should improve links with Burnley Barracks Station, see Proposal Transport and Movement Proposal TM9/3.

EW1/7 – Calder Vale Road (1.17ha.)

Located in Burnley Town Centre this site is suitable for business (B1) uses.

EW1/8 – Clifton Street (0.58ha.)

Located in Burnley Town Centre this site is suitable for business (B1) uses.

EW1/10 – Plumbe Street (1.02ha.)

Located close to Burnley town centre this site is considered suitable for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing (B8) uses and is an ideal location for small business units.

EW1/11- Finsley Wharf/Lambert Howarth (3.5ha.)

South of Burnley town centre this site is allocated for a mixed-use development incorporating business, canal related leisure and tourism uses, and housing. It represents a significant opportunity to regenerate a canalside site. The mill buildings on the site are prominent in a number of views from within Burnley. A sensitively designed scheme making the most of the canalside setting and listed buildings would have considerable potential to enhance employment, tourism and leisure in the Borough. A design statement will be expected to accompany all applications.

Development of the whole of the site is preferred but applications for parts of the site will be considered on their merits.

A Transport Assessment (TA) see Transport and Movement Policy TM2 – “Transport Assessments” and a Leisure Impact Assessment (LIA), where appropriate, will be required with any application.

In 1994, the Council prepared a development brief for the Finsley Wharf site. This is still relevant in parts. This brief will be reviewed as part of the Weaver’s Triangle Masterplan Supplementary Planning Document.

See also General Policy Proposal GP4/1, Economy and Work Proposal EW3/2, and Housing and Local Neighbourhood Proposal H1/10.

EW1/12 – Victoria Mill (0.34ha.)

This Listed Building within the Weavers’ Triangle is considered suitable for a range of uses including general industrial (B2),business (B1), canal related leisure and tourism uses and residential. A suitable mix of these uses may also be acceptable. See also General Policy Proposal GP4/3, Housing and Local Neighbourhood Proposal H1/6, and Burnley Town Centre Proposal BTC6/1. The Council prepared the ‘Sandygate Regeneration Area Planning Brief’ in March 2001 to assist prospective developers.

EW1/13 – Sandygate Mill (0.39ha.)

This site within the Weavers’ Triangle is considered suitable for a range of uses including residential, general industrial (B2), business (B1) and canal related leisure and tourism uses. A suitable mix of these uses may also be acceptable. See also General Policy Proposal GP4/4, Housing and Local Neighbourhood Proposal H179, and Burnley Town Centre Proposal BTC6/2. The Council prepared the ‘Sandygate Regeneration Area Planning Brief’ in March 2001 to assist prospective developers.

EW1/14 – Clock Tower Mill (0.28ha.)

This site of the former Listed Building within the Weavers’ Triangle is considered suitable for a range of uses including general industrial (B2), business (B1), canal related leisure and tourism uses, and residential. A suitable mix of these uses may also be acceptable. See also General Policy Proposal GP4/5, Housing and Local Neighbourhood Proposal H1/8, and Burnley Town Centre Proposal BTC6/3. The Council prepared the ‘Sandygate Regeneration Area Planning Brief’ in March 2001 to assist prospective developers. 

EW1/15 – Wiseman Street (0.38ha.)

This site within the Weavers’ Triangle is considered suitable for a range of uses including residential, general industrial (B2), business (B1) and canal related leisure and tourism uses. A suitable mix of these uses may also be acceptable. See also General Policy Proposal GP4/6, Housing and Local Neighbourhood Proposal H1/9, and Burnley Town Centre Proposal BTC6/4. The Council prepared the ‘Sandygate Regeneration Area Planning Brief’ in March 2001 to assist prospective developers.

EW1/17 – Network 65 (1.38ha.)

Situated close by Junction 9 of the M65, this is a prominent site at the entrance to the recently developed Network 65 estate. This site is suitable for business (B1), general industrial (B2) and warehousing (B8) uses. Any development should seek to minimise the visual impact on the surrounding landscape and protect and enhance the wildlife value of the site.

An ecological survey of the site will be required to accompany any planning application. Should any mitigation measures be identified in such a report they will be a condition of any planning approval.

EW1/20 – Liverpool Road (5.40ha.)

Carried forward from the First Review Local Plan the site is suitable for the expansion of existing industry or the establishment of new business activity. The site has outline permission for B1, B2 and B8 uses.

EW1/21 – Network 65 (1.66ha.)

Site within the Network 65 estate. The site has permission for 5 industrial units.

EW1/22 – Stanhope Street (0.53ha.)

Prominent road frontage site identified in the Burnley Gateway Study prepared by Lambert Smith Hampton in 2005.

5.14.

Justification

One of the Local Plan’s main contributions to the modernisation and diversification of the local economy is to provide the right type of site in the right location.

5.15.

The Joint Lancashire Structure Plan provides the context for business and industrial land allocations (Use Classes B1, B2 and B8). Policy 14 of the Deposit Edition of the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan indicates that 70 hectares of employment land should be provided over the period 2001 to 2016. The following table summarises the business and land provision for the Borough and takes account of the following:

  • Completions between 2001 and 2004;
  • Land with planning permission for business and industrial development which is considered to be likely to be developed during the plan period; and
  • Allocations to meet the overall business and industrial land requirement.

Business and Industrial Land Provision 2001 – 2016

Joint Structure  
Plan Requirement
70Ha.
  
Sites Built 2001-2004 10.71Ha.
  
Sites with planning permission and new allocations
57.19Ha.

Sites built 2001 – 2004

Land at Shuttleworth Mead2.84Ha. 
EW1/9 – Network 654.74Ha.
EW1/16 – Network 651.40Ha.
EW1/18 – Network 651.73Ha.
Total10.71Ha.
5.16.

The Burnley Local Plan allocates 67.90 Ha of land. The allocated sites provide choice in terms of site type and location. These allocations will also foster the growth and diversification of the local economy, particularly in the target sectors identified by the North West Regional Development Agency. The remaining 2.10 hectares of land needed to meet the Structure Plan requirement will be identified through the Area Action Plans to be drawn up within the Housing Market Renewal Areas as Neighbourhood Opportunity Sites. The timetable for the production of these Area Action Plans is set out in Burnley’s Local Development Scheme.

5.17.

Structural changes in the economy, increasing mechanisation and reliance on new technology and networking, allied with a planned focus on “growth sectors” and clusters must be taken into account when selecting sites. The North West Development Agency’s Regional Strategy identifies seven established business sectors and seven emerging target sectors which the North West must seek to expand in order to increase its competitiveness.

5.18.

The seven target sectors are:

  • Environmental technologies;
  • Life science industries – biotechnology and pharmaceuticals;
  • Medical equipment and technology;
  • Financial and professional services;
  • Tourism;
  • Computer services and software and services/internet based services; and
  • Creative industries, media, advertising and public relations.
5.19.

The seven established sectors are:

  • Chemicals;
  • Textiles;
  • Aerospace;
  • Mechanical and other engineering;
  • Energy;
  • Automotive; and
  • Food and drink.
5.20.

Regional Spatial Strategy supports this approach in policies EC1 – “Strengthening the Regional Economy” and EC2 – “Manufacturing Industry” . The Council through the Economic Development Strategy and Local Plan will seek to modernise the Borough’s existing established businesses. This particularly applies to the existing textile, aerospace, engineering and automotive sectors. It will also seek to diversify the local economy by providing sites to attract new business and industry, particularly financial and professional services, tourism and computer and internet based services. Service sector industry is currently poorly represented in the economy of Burnley and Padiham. The sites identified in the town centres in the Burnley Local Plan will seek to redress this deficiency

Targets: EW1a, EW1b, EW7a and EW7b

POLICY EW2 - MAJOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OUTSIDE BURNLEY AND PADIHAM TOWN CENTRE INSETS

Major retail development, including mill shops, (in excess of 2500 square metres gross new, or additional floorspace) outside the Burnley and Padiham town centre boundaries, as defined on the Proposals Map, will not be permitted unless:

  1. it can be demonstrated that there is a need for the proposed development;
  2. the proposal satisfies the sequential approach to site selection in that it can be demonstrated that no suitable site is available within the main/secondary shopping areas of Burnley and Padiham town centres or on allocated retail sites, followed by edge of centre sites within the town centre inset boundary, district and local centres and only then out-of-centre sites that are accessible by a choice of means of transport;
  3. the proposed development would not adversely affect the strategy of the Burnley Local Plan;
  4. the proposal will not adversely affect the vitality and viability of Burnley and Padiham town centres, or any other nearby town centre;
  5. the proposed development would be accessible by a choice of transport which, where necessary includes a Travel Plan;
  6. the proposed development will not lead to an unacceptable increase in car travel; and
  7. the proposal includes, where appropriate, training and recruitment provision as required by Policy EW10 – “Development and Training Provision” of the Burnley Local Plan.

This Policy will apply to all retail proposals including mixed-use developments and factory shops. 

5.21.

Justification

The Burnley Local Plan Strategy seeks to concentrate all new major retail development in, or adjoining, the main shopping areas of Burnley and Padiham town centres. This policy seeks to achieve this by controlling retail development outside town centres using the ‘sequential approach’ set out in PPS6 “Planning for Town Centres”, Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West (RSS) (policy EC8 “ Retail, Leisure and Office Development” ) and the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan 2001-2016 (Policy 16 Retail, Entertainment and Leisure Development). All new retail development within Burnley and Padiham town centres will be assessed sequentially using town centre policies BTC3 and PTC1 PTC2 and PTC3. By pursuing this strategy the Burnley Local Plan will protect the vitality and viability of Burnley and Padiham town centres.

5.22.

Food retail development in Burnley has seen recent developments by Tesco, Sainsbury’s and Netto. A Retail and Leisure Study commissioned by the Council from Savills in 2005, has identifiedcapacity for additional food retail development up to 2016. Any major food retail proposals will be carefully assessed against the capacity identified in the study.

5.23.

Nationally, non-food retailing has seen an increasing move to large single level stores outside town centres, often grouped together in retail parks. Burnley Borough Council has successfully resisted the trend towards “out of town” sites and will continue to do so. The Asda Retail Park, which is located just beyond the town centre, is the main example of this type of development in the Borough. Such development is often car based with a “bulky goods” element but such uses can equally well be located in the town centre.

5.24.

For all proposals over 2,500m2 the local planning authority will require developers to provide a Retail Impact Assessment. The format of this is to be agreed in advance with the local planning authority and will consider issues such as:

  • need;
  • use of the sequential approach and consideration of alternative sites;
  • the vitality and viability of Burnley and Padiham town centres;
  • accessibility by a choice of means of transport;
  • likely changes in travel patterns over the catchment area; and
  • any significant environmental impacts.
5.25.

The assessment of need can cover a wide range of quantitative and qualitative matters including the issue of “food deserts”, retail capacity, retailer demand and providing for wider choice. This list is not exhaustive and the balance of considerations will vary with each proposal. Other matters may be considered where they are of relevance to a proposed development.

5.26.

Retail Impact Assessments may, on occasion, be required for smaller developments such as those that may have a particular impact on a local centre or affect a particular retail sector. 

5.27.

Retail developments are significant generators of traffic. All major retail proposals will be assessed for their impact on travel and car use, and must be accessible by other modes such as foot, cycle and public transport. Developers will be expected to demonstrate particular attention to improving access by non-car modes.

5.28.

Some larger retail proposals can fulfil a more localised need. Recent examples in the Borough include the Briercliffe Road Neighbourhood Centre development and the Kwik Save on Accrington Road. In such instances, it will be for the applicant to demonstrate that such a proposal fulfils a local need, usually by submitting a Retail Impact Assessment.

5.29.

The format of retail development is subject to considerable change with the range of goods sold within a store increasingly flexible. Shopping is increasingly marketed as a “leisure experience”. Factory and mill shops, often in peripheral locations, are increasingly popular forms of retailing in some cases contributing to the tourist economy. However, links between manufacturing and sales are on occasions tenuous and the range of goods sold can directly compete with town centres.

5.30.

The Burnley Local Plan’s policies for local shops can be found in the Community Facilities chapter, and those policies for the town centres in the Burnley and Padiham town centre chapters.

POLICY EW3 - NEW LEISURE, TOURIST, ARTS AND CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT OUTSIDE TOWN CENTRES

Proposals for new and expanded leisure, tourist, arts and cultural facilities outside Burnley and Padiham town centre insets will be permitted where the proposal fulfils the following:

For all proposals over 2500m²:

  1. the applicant can clearly demonstrate that there is a need for the proposal (including all constituent elements); and
  2. that the proposal satisfies the sequential approach to site selection in that it can be demonstrated that no suitable site is available within the town centre inset boundaries of Burnley or Padiham, or allocated elsewhere in the Local Plan, district and local centres and only then using out-of-centre sites in locations that are accessible by a choice of means of transport

For all proposals:

  1. it is of a scale, character, design and appearance compatible with its surroundings;
  2. it does not harm the residential amenity of local residents;
  3. it would not create an unacceptable concentration of one use class;
  4. it is accessible, or potentially accessible, by a choice of means of transport;
  5. the road network, with any suitable improvements proposed, is capable of accommodating predicted traffic levels; and
  6. includes, where appropriate, training and recruitment provision as required by Policy EW10 – ‘Development and Training Provision’ of the Burnley Local Plan.

The following sites have been allocated on the Proposals Map for the uses described:

EW3/1 Bank Hall Marina (1.8ha.).

This site was allocated in the First Review of the Burnley Local Plan and is retained for canal related leisure uses. A Development Brief was prepared and approved for this site in 1988, although relevant in part this will be reviewed. A Transport Assessment (TA) - see Transport Policy TM2 - and a Leisure Impact Assessment (LIA) will be required with any application.

EW3/2: Finsley Wharf/ Lambert Howarth (3.5ha.).

This allocation south of Burnley town centre is considered to be especially suitable for a mixed-use development incorporating business, canal related leisure and tourism uses, and housing. It represents a significant opportunity to regenerate a canalside site. The mill buildings on the site are prominent from a number of views within Burnley. A sensitively designed scheme making the most of the canalside setting, and listed buildings, has considerable potential to enhance tourism and leisure in the Borough. A design statement will be expected to accompany all applications. Development of the whole of the site is preferred but applications for parts of the site will be considered on their merits. A Transport Assessment (TA), see Transport and Movement Policy TM2 “Transport Assessments” and a Leisure Impact Assessment (LIA), where appropriate, will be required with any application. See also General Policy Proposal GP4/1, Economy and Work Proposal EW1/11, and Housing and Local Neighbourhood Proposal H1/10.

EW3/3 Queen Street Mill, Museum

Tourism development related to the Museum will be permitted. Other locations identified for leisure and tourism development and shown on the Burnley Town Centre Inset Map are:

  • BTC5/1 - Meadow Street & Queens Lancashire Way
  • BTC5/2 - Mill, Sutcliffe Street
  • BTC5/3 – Sainsburys
  • BTC5/4 - Kierby Hotel
  • BTC5/5 – Empire Theatre
  • BTC6/1 – Victoria Mill
  • BTC6/2 – Sandygate Mill
  • BTC6/3 – Clock Tower Mill
  • BTC6/4 – Wiseman Street
  • BTC6/5 – Slater’s Terrace
5.31.

Justification

Tourism, the Arts, Culture and Leisure are not just recreational issues, they are significant sources of employment. The growth of leisure time and expenditure on such activities means such uses have the potential to create many more jobs. These activities also go some way to providing a ‘quality lifestyle’ and attract people to, and help retain people in the area.

5.32.

Tourism, in particular, is making an increasingly important contribution to the local economy. The Regional Economic Strategy identifies tourism uses as one of seven key “growth sectors”. Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West (RSS) Policy EC9 “Tourism and Recreation” supports this approach, as does Policy 16 of the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan 2001-2016. In Burnley, tourism builds on factors such as the attractive countryside, the town’s heritage, including Towneley and Gawthorpe Halls, Burnley Football Club, mill shops and cultural events such as the annual Blues Festival.

5.33.

The growth of tourism and leisure is particularly reflected in pressures for new and enhanced attractions and additional accommodation. There is a particular need for a four star hotel and youth hostel in the Borough. It is important that such expansion is supported in a manner that is sustainable.

5.34.

Major leisure proposals outside town centres can have a significant impact on existing provision within the centres of Burnley and Padiham. Applications for proposals over 2,500m² gross floorspace will therefore be required to submit a Leisure Impact Assessment (LIA) examining the need for each element of the proposal and why the proposal cannot be located in the town centres. Smaller sites will be required to provide supporting information and may be requested to provide a full LIA if the proposal is considered to have a significant impact.

Targets: EW6a, and EW6b.

POLICY EW4 - EXPANSION AND IMPROVEMENT OF EXISTING BUSINESSES

Development that would lead to the expansion or improvement of existing business premises will be permitted when it:

  1. is suitable in terms of size, layout, access, parking, design and landscaping;
  2. does not harm the amenity of nearby occupiers;
  3. does not harm the character, appearance or environment of the site and its surroundings;
  4. includes, where appropriate, measures to improve security;
  5. has adequate access, or potential access, by a choice of transport modes;
  6. includes , where necessary, a Travel Plan, see Transport and Movement Policy TM3 – “Travel Plans”;
  7. includes, where appropriate, training and recruitment provisions as required by Policy EW10 – ‘Development and Training Provision’ of the Burnley Local Plan;
  8. retains and enhances any built and natural features/areas that contribute to the amenity or biodiversity of the area; and
  9. includes mechanisms to improve environmental performance to that of current best practice standards.
5.35.

Justification

The Council recognises that changing business requirements, business expansion and technological changes mean business has to constantly adapt and improve. For some businesses, growth and technological change will result in the need for expansion space. In many cases, this will be preferable to relocation as it will enable utilisation of existing plant and help retain the current workforce. The Council will particularly seek to support businesses operating in the growth sectors identified by the Council and the North West Regional Development Agency. The requirements of business, however, have to be balanced against any negative impacts such proposals may have on other uses such as neighbouring residential properties, or sensitive habitats.

Targets: EW2b, EW5b, EW8a – EW8d and EW8f

POLICY EW5 - DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT OF MAJOR INDUSTRIAL ESTATES

The Council will permit the expansion and improvement of existing
employment uses on the following industrial estates identified on
the Proposals Map

  • EW5/1 Heasandford
  • EW5/2 Rossendale Road
  • EW5/3 Network 65
  • EW5/4 Shuttleworth Mead

When assessing such proposals the Council will require a planning
application to demonstrate that:

  1. it includes measures to improve security;
  2. it includes landscaping and screening, where necessary;
  3. it incorporates mechanisms to improve environmental performance to that of current best practice standards;
  4. it is accessible by a choice of transport modes;
  5. it includes, where necessary, a Travel Plan see Transport and Movement Policy TM3 – “Travel Plans”;
  6. it retains and enhances any built and natural features/areas thatcontribute to the amenity or biodiversity of the area; and
  7. it includes , where appropriate, training and recruitment provisions as reflected in Policy EW10 – ‘Development and Training Provision’ of the Burnley Local Plan.
5.36.

Justification

Established industrial estates contain many of the main employers and jobs in the Borough. It is essential for the Borough’s economy that these areas are able to flourish and that new businesses are attracted.

5.37.

A number of factors impact on the attractiveness of industrial estates. For example, Rossendale Road Industrial Estate has suffered increasing problems with vandalism and theft. A number of initiatives have already been taken to address this particular issue, and others, such as signage. The Council will continue to seek to identify funding and work with partners to enhance the image and operation of major industrial estates.

5.38.

The implementation of a initiatives addressing goods vehicle routing will improve lorry access to these locations.

5.39.

Applications for new development at these locations offer opportunities for developers to tailor buildings to current needs. This should be undertaken in the context of contributing towards enhancing the industrial estate as a whole. Improvements to the appearance of buildings and improved energy efficiency complement other policies in this plan such as General Policies GP3 – Design and Quality, GP8 Energy Conservation and Efficiency and GP9 – Security and Planning Out Crime. Environmental management techniques such as that embodied in the internationally recognised ISO 14001 enable such issues to be addressed in a comprehensive manner.

Targets: EW2a.

POLICY EW6 - ECONOMIC IMPROVEMENT AREAS

The following Economic Improvement Areas are identified on the Proposals Map:

  • EW6/1 - Elm Street, Daneshouse
  • EW6/2 - Gannow Lane & Rosegrove?? EW6/3 - Lune Street, Padiham
  • EW6/4 - Thompson Street, Padiham
  • EW6/5 - Queen Street, Harle Syke
  • EW6/6 – Smallshaw Industrial Estate, Accrington Road.

Within these areas the Council will permit development that would lead to the expansion, or improvement, of existing business providing that the proposed development satisfies the following:

  1. it is acceptable with respect to size, layout, access, parking, design and landscaping;
  2. it would not harm the amenity of nearby occupiers;
  3. it includes measures to improve security;
  4. is accessible by a choice of transport modes;
  5. includes, where necessary, a Travel Plan, see Transport and Movement Policy TM3 – “Travel Plans”;
  6. it includes mechanisms to improve environmental performance to that of current best practice;
  7. it would enhance the character, appearance and environment of the site and its surroundings;
  8. it retains and enhances any built and natural features/areas that contribute to the amenity or biodiversity of the area; and
  9. the proposal includes, where appropriate, training and recruitment provisions as reflected in Policy EW10 – ‘Development and Training Provision’ of the Burnley Local Plan.
5.40.

Justification

The rapid development of cotton and other manufacturing industry in Burnley has left a substantial legacy of traditional industrial buildings concentrated in areas such as Daneshouse, Harle Syke and the Thompson Street area of Padiham.

5.41.

Older buildings can provide valuable low cost floorspace for local businesses. In some cases, they present attractive opportunities for conversion from industrial to service uses. Policy DP1 “Economy in the Use of Land and Buildings” of Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West (RSS) encourages the effective use of existing buildings and infrastructure. However, inadequate access arrangements; buildings in poor condition; and low environmental quality constrain attractiveness for employers in the 21st century and can have detrimental effects on local residents.

5.42.

Addressing such problems will require a multi-faceted approach. A major element of this involves the identification of areas where investment in buildings, environment and access will be encouraged. The areas identified in the policy are considered to be those with the greatest potential to contribute to the diversification of the Borough’s economy. The Council will prepare Development Strategies for each area identifying key actions required and forming the basis for funding bids.

5.43.

The implementation of initiatives addressing goods vehicle routing (see Policy TM13 – “ Movement of Freight”) will improve lorry access to these locations.

Targets: EW8a – EW8d and EW8f

POLICY EW7 - REDEVELOPMENT OF EXISTING EMPLOYMENT LAND AND PREMISES FOR NON-EMPLOYMENT USES

Outside the town centres, major industrial estates and Economic Improvement Areas proposals to redevelop existing employment sites for other uses will be permitted when the applicant can demonstrate that:

  1. the continued use of the site for the current employment use would cause unacceptable harm to the character and amenity of the surrounding area; or
  2. the site is no longer suited in land use terms for continued employment use by reason of poor vehicular access, incompatibility with surrounding land uses, or poor access to public transport routes.
5.44.

Justification

Significant amounts of older floorspace in the Borough are either vacant, in poor condition, or suffer from inadequate servicing. A number of former mill buildings are isolated in locations that are now predominantly residential. This can cause problems for local households. Run down and vacant mill buildings contribute significantly to the Borough’s poor image. However, other buildings of this type can be successfully reused and do not cause a nuisance. The Council will use this policy to assess which sites can be released for other uses and those which should remain in employment use.

5.45.

A Strategy for the re-use of former mill buildings throughout the Borough will be prepared to provide an overall context for guiding development and investment decisions.

POLICY EW8 - CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

Planning permission for development involving the use, storage, or movement, of hazardous substances as defined in the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Act 1990 will only be permitted if:

  1. the health, safety and amenity of users of the site, or surrounding land are not put at risk; and
  2. the quality of the local environment is protected.
5.46.

Justification

Some industries by the nature of their operation have to utilise hazardous substances. The Health and Safety Executive control the storage and use of hazardous substances under non-planning legislation. The primary role of the planning system is to locate hazardous industry where risks can be minimised. This policy seeks to ensure that development controlled under the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Act 1990 does not cause unacceptable risks to users of the site, or to nearby development. The advice of the Environment Agency and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) will be sought on all applications. In considering proposals the Council will consider the existing use of the site; the amount of substance proposed; proximity to sensitive uses, and the degree of risk caused.

5.47.

Potentially polluting uses will be assessed against General Policy GP7 – ‘New Development and the Control of Pollution’ of the Burnley Local Plan.

POLICY EW9 - SMALL BUSINESSES, WORKING FROM HOME, AND COMMUNITY ENTERPRISES IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS

Small business activities, homeworking, or small-scale community based businesses will be permitted within residential areas where they do not:

  1. adversely affect residential amenity, by reason of noise or other nuisance; or
  2. lead to disturbance, or problems of highway safety, caused by motor vehicles visiting or leaving the site.

Small businesses are defined as those with ten or less employees.

5.48.

Justification

The rate of new business formation in the Borough of Burnley is relatively low and is exceeded by the failure rate. Increasing the number and viability of small businesses is a key element of the Burnley Economic Development Strategy (Strategic Objective 3 – Extending Entrepreneurship). The planning process can positively contribute to the success of small businesses. Examples of how this may apply include supporting the conversion of existing buildings into smaller units and innovative schemes to link training, employment and living space.

5.49.

A number of small businesses have always been found in residential areas and indeed within residential properties. The development of information technology has enabled a much greater number of people to work from home for all, or part, of the week. Depending on the scale of the operation this, in many cases, falls outside the remit of the planning system. Even where it does constitute a business use that requires planning permission it can frequently be undertaken without harm to the neighbourhood, and where this is the case, it will be permitted.

5.50.

Community based businesses and enterprises such as co-operatives help to develop the confidence, skills and aspirations of individuals and local communities as well as addressing the issues of poverty and exclusion. Such businesses encompass a wide variety of opportunities including financial services, training/advice centres and communal gardening projects. Such projects can form a vital stepping stone for individuals into the formal economy. Community Economic Development plays an increasingly important role in reducing social exclusion in more deprived areas of the Borough and is a major component of the Burnley Regeneration Forum’s SRB6 programme, and the Burnley Economic Development Strategy.

5.51.

This policy should be seen as complementary to Burnley Local Plan Policy H12 – “Non-Residential Uses in Residential Areas”. This policy, whilst recognising potential impacts on residential amenity, fundamentally seeks to facilitate innovative ways of combining work and living, the development of community based initiatives and small businesses that grow out of these. Policy H12 focuses on preventing incompatible business uses in residential locations.

Targets: EW5a – Ew5c.

POLICY EW10 - DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING PROVISION

The Council will increase training and recruitment opportunities for local residents by:

  1. giving favourable consideration to proposals for training facilities providing they do not conflict with other policies and proposals of the Burnley Local Plan; and
  2. through unilateral undertakings and Section 106 Agreements with developers of major employment generating projects for training provision for local people.

Major employment generating projects are those providing in excess of 100 full time equivalent jobs, or with a gross site area of 3 hectares or more.

5.52.

Justification

The Economic Development Strategy for the Borough identifies a link between low skills and poor employment opportunities. Thus, those with the lowest skills are most likely to be either out of work, or in low paid jobs. The Borough’s Economic Development Strategy recognises that a sustainable economy cannot ignore such groups and that quality employment opportunities should be accessible by all. Promoting social inclusion and pursuing social progress which meets the needs of all are also central elements of the Local Plan Strategy, the North West Development Agency’s (NWDA) Regional Strategy, and Government guidance in PPS12: “Local Development Frameworks”. 

5.53.

To effectively diversify the economy and to encourage the employment of local people it will be essential to address the issue of training. Locating jobs close to deprived areas can help in terms of physical accessibility, but will not necessarily help unemployed and low skilled people compete in the job market, particularly in new technology. By addressing training provision the Local Plan seeks to bring about a more inclusive community.

5.54.

Increasing opportunities for the unemployed, young people, women, older workers and ethnic minorities will be especially important. These are the groups most likely to suffer problems in the job market. In order to facilitate the employment of individuals in this category the Council will encourage major new employment proposals to contribute to a Section 106 agreement on training and recruitment. Contributions made will feed into initiatives to train local people in new skills, especially in sectors where shortages exist and to assist employers in identifying suitably skilled staff. This policy will be implemented in conjunction with the Lancashire Learning and Skills Council, the existing Burnley Employment and Training Charter, the New Deal Welfare to Work, and any other relevant training or employment initiative.

5.55.

Lack of suitably skilled local people can create recruitment problems for employers, increase costs, and inhibit the expansion and diversification of the local economy. Recruitment from outside the Borough can lead to less sustainable patterns of “in-commuting”. This policy seeks to help meet the recruitment needs of employers, whilst improving the skills of ocal people.

5.56.

Provision of new training facilities in areas suffering from deprivation, for example the Housing Areas designated in Housing and Local Neighbourhoods Policy H9 – “Regenerating Urban Areas and Neighbourhoods”, can help improve physical access to training. This would be complementary to many government-sponsored initiatives. Onsite training facilities for major businesses can also be valuable.

POLICY EW11 - RURAL DIVERSIFICATION AND CONVERSION OF RURAL BUILDINGS FOR EMPLOYMENT USES

Proposals for rural diversification and conversion of rural buildings for employment uses will be permitted where:

  1. they are of an appropriate scale and character;
  2. the proposal re-uses existing buildings;
  3. proposed new buildings and hardstandings are of a limited extent, and of appropriate design and materials to the landscape character of the area; and
  4. the site has adequate access, preferably including by means other than the private car, and its development will not give rise to an unacceptable increase in travel.

Proposals within the defined Green Belt will be expected to comply with Burnley Local Plan Environment policy E28 – ‘Development in the Green Belt’.

5.57.

Justification

In rural areas employment in agriculture has continued to decline, as sheep farming becomes increasingly marginal. This time of change opens up a number of opportunities. Examples include bringing redundant farm buildings back into use, creating jobs for local people in growth sectors, and improving the area’s image. Many hill farmers are now part time and have, in some cases, been seeking to diversify their activities, for example, into tourism and the haulage industry. Other rural based operations, such as equestrian centres have been established around the Borough, reflecting the growing market for this activity. Employment in mining and quarrying is minimal.

5.58.

In Burnley the countryside is never far from the town. The settlements identified in General Policy GP2 - “Development in Rural Areas” are primarily commuter settlements dependent on the urban area for jobs and services. A number of businesses have in the past moved into the rural areas. This has primarily been because of its positive image. While this has advantages in jobs being close to local people it can also exacerbate “reverse commuting” from the urban area to locations that are difficult to access except by the private car.

5.59.

Government guidance in the Rural White Paper and in PPS7 “Sustainable Development in Rural Areas” encourages the use of redundant barns for business use. Objective 5 of the North West Development Agency’s (NWDA) Regional Economic Strategy emphasises the importance of rural renaissance, a point re-iterated in Regional Spatial Strategy (RSS) policies RU1 – “Sustainable Agriculture” and RU2 – Diversification of the Rural Economy.

Targets: EW3a and EW3b.

« Back to contents page | Back to top